Category Archives: Horror: Yeti

Films (or entertainment that passes as film) that looks at creatures with names like Yeti, Bigfoot, or Sasquatch. Perhaps not high quality looks…

Bigfoot

Opening Thoughts

Date:
1970
Stars:
John Carradine
Joi Landsin
Judy Jordan
Writers:
Robert F. Slatzer

James Gordon White
Director:
Robert F. Slatzer
WRC Score:
2/4

(-_-)p
Note: 
First posted in a different form on June 10, 2012

Here’s a movie that used to appear all the time on television, back in my fabled youth, that now has seemed to have vanish into the ether. Not that having vanished is necessarily a bad thing, mind you. It’s just that I’ve been a-looking and now that I’ve found it, I’m gonna watch it.

(Well, as this is a reboot review, I’ve already watched it.  But you know what I mean.)

As the name implies, this movie is about the fabled Bigfoot, cousin to the yeti. The last time we dabbled with his kind left a mark, of sorts. That was The Snow Creature, first of the Yeti/Bigfoot pictures. Such fond memories it inspires. At least in the writing of the review, if in no way the movie itself.

Shall this one bring similar “pleasant” memories? As we are on a streak of writing these openings before I actually watch the film, you already know the answer to that. But perhaps the journey to that destination will amuse. It is always my hope.

Before moving to the next page, though, it would be remiss of me not to mention that this will be John Carradine‘s first “appearance” here at Welltun Cares Reviews. As Mr. Carradine was the hardest working man in Genre films (kinda sorta) we will no doubt see more of him in future.

That said, head off to the next page for an extensive look at a film that frankly doesn’t rate it.  Par for the course around here, when you think about it…

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The Snow Creature

Opening Thoughts

Date:
1954
Stars:
Paul Langton

Leslie Denison

Teru Shimada
Writer:
Myles Wilder
Director:
W. Lee Wilder
WRC Score:
1.5/4

(-_-)p
Note: 
First posted in a
different form on
September 17, 2011

What does Frankenstein (1910), The Werewolf (1913), and The Snow Creature have in common?

Besides being all in black and white, I mean.

Well, all three of them happen to be firsts. They are, in order, the first Frankenstein movie, the first Werewolf movie, and the very first Yeti movie.

Okay, okay, there also movies you wouldn’t associate with one another on a bet unless you were desperate for an opening to a review. Must there always be such bitterness between us?

Silliness aside, The Snow Creature didn’t just kicked off not only a spate of similar films in the fifties. It also started an entire sub-genre of films dealing with the Yeti and his cousin Big Foot. This sub-genre is, sad to say not very well-regarded.

There is a reason for this: Yeti/Big Foot movies aren’t very good.

But that’s a discussion for another day. What about our feature film? As you can see above, this particular reviewer didn’t care for it that much. If his reasons valid?

Let’s turn the page and see.

Bigfoot

Date:
1970
Stars:
John Carradine
Joi Landsin
Judy Jordan
Writers:
Robert F. Slatzer

James Gordon White
Director:
Robert F. Slatzer
WRC Score:
2/4

(-_-)p
Note: 
First posted in a different form on June 10, 2012

2016-link-box-002

Let’s see if you’ve heard this one before.  A traveling con artist and his cousin enter the woods and happen upon proof of the fabled Bigfoot living in the woods.  At the same time, a young biker loses his girl to what seems like a similar creature.  In the fullness of time the three unite to solve this age-old mystery once and for all.

While it sounds like a lot of different monster movies, it eventually boils down into a King Kong clone.  It takes place in the woods instead of a Lost World, and bikers instead of dinosaurs. Or… or something like that.

The important part is that this comes close to being one of the better Z-grade feature.   Because it’s coherent.  And yes, that’s a big selling point.  Watch enough Z-grade flicks, see how quick that begins to matter.

What kills it is, though, is what usually kills this grade of picture: padding, cardboard characters, odd editing choices, and frankly bad acting (Carradine and John Mitchum being noticeable (if hammy) exception). Thrills or excitement might be absent for the adult viewer. Kids might like it–for instance I seem to recall being quite fond of it as a child–but don’t be too shocked if they don’t. (0.5 points)

While I did just bad mouth it in the last paragraph, I have to confess that I did like this film (1.5 point).  Unlike many other of his movies, there’s plenty of Carradine to go around, and the old boy could  be quite entertaining when the spirit possessed him.  I fear, though, this is a Cullen movie, and thus I’m also giving it a mild NOT RECOMMEND if you’re not a big Carradine fan.

And into padding.

And bad monster suits.

And…

Score: 2 points out of a possible 4 (-_-)p

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The Snow Creature

Date:
1954
Stars:
Paul Langton

Leslie Denison

Teru Shimada
Writer:
Myles Wilder
Director:
W. Lee Wilder
WRC Score:
1.5/4

(-_-)p
Note: 
First posted in a
different form on
September 17, 2011

2016-link box-001

The Snow Creature details the travails of an American botany expedition to the Himalaya Mountains.  As they look at the local flora, word reaches them that a Yeti has kidnapped the wife of their guide.  The Americans laugh it off, but for some reason the guide doesn’t see the humor in the situation.  Conflict ensues.

This, as far as I can tell, is the first Yeti movie.  Or at least the first American one.  Whatever the case may be, it sets the standards for an entire subgenre.  A standard that most Yeti/Bigfoot movies find easy to hit, as it’s quite low.

You can step over it low.

Almost buried in the ground low.

Signs of quality pop up in the flick in both script and acting, but neither in such qualities as to come close to saving it.  Everything’s bogged down by an excess of stock footage, narrated action, and reuse of scenes.  Reused scenes, hell.  The last portion of the flick seems to consist of nothing but.

My big sticking point is the protagonist, the leader of the American botany expedition.  It might be a shift in cultural attitude, but to my modern eyes this guy is one hateful piece of work, to the point I was kind of hoping for his death before the end.  This, I should point out, isn’t usual for me.  Hopefully it never happens again.

One might find mocking this movie’s badness (.5 points) a treat.  Me, I don’t much care for The Snow Creature either way. (1 point).  Wasted potential is all it is.

Total: 1.5 points out of a possible 4.

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